SYNOPSIS OF SERVICES


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Casework Services…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...3

Open Door Intervention Services…………………………………………………………………………………………….4

Nurturing Parenting………………………………………………………………..…………………………………………………5

Supervised Visitation & Corollary Services………………………………………………………………………………6

Domestic Violence Services……………………………………………………………………………………………………...7

Anger Management…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..8

Home Studies……….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………9

Paperwork Protocol…..…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….10

Traditional Foster Care …………………………………………………………………………………………..……………….11

Specialized Foster Care…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….12

Mother/Child Placement………………………………………………………………………………………………………….14

Adoption Services…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….15

 


CASEWORK SERVICES

Provide casework services for a variety of scenarios for up to six hours per week
Design a program and tailor services specific to the needs of each particular child, youth or family
Caseworker can serve as the primary service provider or facilitate the referral process to service providers within the community
Target populations of casework services are as follows:

Families working to prevent out-of-home placement of a child
Families working toward the return of a child from out-of-home placement
Families in the process of reunification

Assist with advocacy, parenting skills, linking to community resources, remediating conflict within the home, monitor current service involvement, etc.
Services are completed on an hourly basis up to six hours per seven day week
Services can be delivered in the home, school and community
Emergency on-call staff are available 24/7 to handle crisis situations
Individual case notes are maintained for each client
County Caseworkers will receive a combination of the following documentation:

Weekly progress reports
Quarterly reports to be submitted every 90 days
Weekly phone, email, and/or face-to-face contact with the assigned OPEN DOOR Caseworker
Discharge reports

 
 
OPEN DOOR INTERVENTION SERVICES  (ODIS)

Focus is on providing quick response in-home services to families in crisis
Goal is to intervene immediately and frequently to resolve any issues
Services are available seven days per week
Designed to be implemented for seven or more hours per week
Emergency on-call staff are available 24/7 to handle crisis situations
The following are examples of issues that can be alleviated through intervention services:

Truancy
Mental Health
Newly Blended Families
Negligence and Medical Neglect
Substance Abuse
Unstable Housing and Financial Concerns
Parental Conflict and Domestic Abuse

County Caseworkers will receive a combination of the following documentation:

Weekly progress reports
Quarterly reports to be submitted every 90 days
Weekly phone, email, and/or face-to-face contact with the assigned OPEN DOOR Caseworker
Discharge reports


COMMUNITY BASED EDUCATION IN NURTURING PARENTING

Versatile curriculum designed to educate families on the philosophy and skills of nurturing parenting
Comprised of ten, 60 – 90 minute lessons
Included in each lesson:

Goals and objectives
Discussion topics
Interactive activities
Worksheets and handouts
Evaluation tools

Appropriate for first-time parents, extended family, and families in crisis
Available in an in-office setting, in the family’s home, or in a group class
Lesson themes are as follows:

Understanding Feelings
Alternatives to Spanking
Communicating with Respect
Building Self-Worth in Children
Praising Children and their Behavior
Ages and Stages of Growth for Infants and Toddlers
The Philosophy and Practices of Nurturing Parenting
Learning Positive Ways to Deal with Stress and Anger
Understanding and Developing Family Morals, Values and Rules
Ways to Enhance Positive Brain Development in Children and Teens


SUPERVISED VISITATION WITH OPTIONAL VISIT COACHING

Offered between children in out-of-home placement and their parent(s) or proposed caregiver(s)
May take place at OPEN DOOR’s office, in the home, at the location of placement or in the community
Interaction between the adult(s) and child(ren) is monitored and documented
Specific attention is paid to the parenting strengths and weaknesses of the adult(s) in the visit
Detailed visit summary is provided to the staff from the referring agency for each visit
Visits are offered on a fully-supervised or semi-supervised basis
Visit Coaching Component

15-30 minute pre-visit meeting with parents/guardians so that they can identify the needs of the child that must be met in the upcoming visit, practice the skills necessary to meet those needs and develop structure for the visit
15-30 minute post-visit meeting with parents/guardians to review the visit supervisor’s assessment of their progress meeting the pre-identified needs of the child, compare that assessment with the parent’s/guardian’s self-assessment of their success in meeting the needs of the child and to provide support

 
COROLLARY SERVICES

Transportation

Used to get clients and their families to mental health appointments, medical appointments, court appearances and visitations
No limit to the distance to be traveled as long as staff are available
Available 7 days/wk

Translation

Available for Spanish speaking clients
Used to translate for such County purposes as relaying information from the County worker to the client and vice-versa, and initial interviews of clients
Capable of translating for appointments, evaluations, meetings and paperwork processes
Available 7 days/wk
Translators are not Pennsylvania certified

 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

Evaluations and assessments are conducted by a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC)
Offender and non-offender psycho-educational groups are provided for men and women for whom group interventions are recommended
Clients are contacted within two business days of the receipt of the referral to schedule the initial assessment
A final evaluation will be submitted to the referring agency within seven business days of the completion of the assessment
Clients referred for group services will be contacted within two business days to schedule an orientation session and proceed with weekly groups
Weekly documentation of each client’s attendance and performance in group is maintained
Detailed discharge reports are provided to the referring agency upon a client’s completion of group
Discharge reports do not comment on the likelihood of one to re-offend or be re-victimized
Group sessions following the Duluth Model are two hours in length and last ten weeks
Letter of completion are issued to clients who complete the program
Weekly topics for English and Spanish speaking men’s groups are as follows:

Nonviolence
Nonthreatening Behavior
Respect
Trust and Support
Honesty and Accountability

Responsible Parenting
Shared Responsibility
Economic Partnership
Sexual Respect
Negotiation and Fairness

Weekly topics for women’s English speaking groups are as follows:

Battering: What is it? Why is it so powerful?
Effects of Battering on Women
Freedom: What would it look like?
Where to men learn to Batter?  The Myths of Battering
Victim Blaming

The Tactics of Men Who Batter
When Our Survival Skills Turn On Us
The Power to Force Submission
Women’s Anger: Why is everybody so afraid of it?
Mind Games: They’re Not Games


Weekly topics for women’s Spanish speaking groups are as follows:

Physical Violence
Intimidation: Effects of Battering on Women
Emotional Abuse
Isolation
Minimize, Deny, Blame

Male Privilege
Use of Coercion and Threats
Economic Abuse
Using Children
Effects


ANGER MANAGEMENT

Based on curriculum developed by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration
Giving clients the basic knowledge and skills necessary to manage their anger
Education on the cycle of anger and conflict
Ultimate goal of reducing one’s outbursts and increasing their coping skills
Comprised of six two-hour sessions to be completed over six weeks
Each session includes lessons, handouts, activities, homework and the maintenance of an anger log
Pre and post-exam is administered to all participants to gauge knowledge retention
Ability to be delivered in one-on-one or group settings
Groups run in six-week intervals due to being closed in nature
Detailed discharge reports are provided to the referring agency upon a client’s completion of the program
Weekly session topics are as follows:

Session One:  Orientation & Overview of Anger Management
Session Two:  Events, Cues & Anger Control Plans
Session Three:  The Aggression Cycle & Cognitive Restructuring
Session Four:  Anger & Relationships
Session Five:  Assertiveness, Conflict Resolution & the Family
Session Six:  Review, Exam & Closure



HOME STUDIES

Intended to provide:

Physical details of the home
Assessment of the family’s strengths and weaknesses
Community resources available to the family

Includes pictures of the home, neighborhood, and family
Family Profile Checklist is as follows:

Introduction
Contact
Identifying Information
Physical Location
Historical Outline
Courtship & Marriage
Financial Stability
Willingness to Accept Custody
Reference Checks
Summary
Recommendations

 

PAPERWORK PROTOCOL

Progress Notes

Completed for each face-to-face and/or phone contact with a family, school or provider
Contains date, location of contact and lists who was present
Provides detailed information on the contact, what was discussed, the client’s progress on goals, and any recent case developments
Sent weekly to County Caseworkers overseeing the case

Quarterly & Discharge Reports

Quarterly Report (see examples)

Completed every 90 days a case is active and is delivered to County Caseworkers
Includes:

Detailed summary of the client’s progress, or lack thereof, with each goal during the 90 day review period being covered
Information included for each singular contact with client:

Date
Location
Type of contact (face-to-face or phone)
Who was present
Content of contact

Date, location and type of each individual contact with the County Caseworker
Detailed account of the OPEN DOOR Caseworker’s interventions and methods utilized
Review of any significant events or issues that required interventions
Discussion of the client’s level of motivation to complete agreed upon goals
Listing of other agencies involved and their specific roles
Recommendations for the family with regard to future treatment goals and areas of concern

Discharge Report

Delivered to County Caseworkers within 10 business days of a case closing

Intake Discharge Report

Detailed summary of the client’s progress on goal completion and the avenues utilized to do so
Explanation of the reason for case closure

TRADITIONAL FOSTER CARE

Target:  Children ages 0-12 whose primary need is a temporary surrogate family through foster care.  Traditional care includes only children who are not in need of therapeutic intervention for emotional, behavioral, or psychiatric diagnoses.

Upon placement the child’s immediate needs are addressed; enrollment in school, physical exam, dental exam, clothing, etc.

Objectives of the Agency

Contact is made with the child a minimum of once per week for four weeks; then bi-weekly for the remainder of the length of placement
Initial review occurs within 30 days, resulting in the Individual Service Plan. The meeting includes the child, biological parents, foster parents, OPEN DOOR Case Counselor and additional involved professionals.  Goals are established to foster continued positive growth and developmental skills; and include:  the visitation plan, educational goals, social/behavioral goals, medical goals, dental goals, and any additional goal deemed appropriate for the particular child 
Quarterly reports are written by the OPEN DOOR Social Worker in consultation with the child, foster parents, biological parents, and other professionals 
OPEN DOOR consistently monitors the child’s developmental, behavioral, social, educational, emotional, medical, and academic progress
Staff establishes goals with the biological parents to assist in remediating the reasons that made placement necessary.  OPEN DOOR provides casework services and serves as a conduit for additional community-based services
Contact with biological parents (or other family return resources) is a minimum of twice per month assuming the goal is for the child to return to the family.  If a child’s goal has been changed to permanent placement or adoption, the services to the biological parents are reduced accordingly. (Parenting Education can also be implemented).



SPECIALIZED FOSTER CARE

Target: Children & Adolescents

Children 0-12 who meet one or more of the following criteria:

The child requires individual psychotherapy
The child is on psychotropic medication
The child has a history of physically aggressive behavior

The child has or qualifies for a diagnosis of ADHD
The child is enrolled in special education classes at school
The child has physical handicaps that require frequent intervention

Adolescents

Those between 12 – 18 years of age are automatically classified as ‘specialized’ foster children due to the behaviors that are common as youth progress through the psychosocial stages and the resulting staff time investment that they require
Adolescents are accepted who have minimal to moderate emotional, academic, and behavioral needs
Note: Sibling groups are accepted into Traditional or Specialized Foster Care by splitting the classification to include one child as ‘specialized’ and the remainder within the same foster home as ‘traditional.’


Objectives of the agency:

Staff visits the child a minimum of once per week for four weeks; then bi-weekly for the remainder of the length of placement
An Initial Review occurs within 30 days, resulting in the Individual Service Plan.  The meeting includes the child, biological parents, foster parents, OPEN DOOR Case Counselor and additional involved professionals.  Goals are established to foster continued positive growth and developmental skills; and include: the visitation plan, educational goals, social/behavioral goals, medical goals, dental goals, specialized treatment goals, independent living skills goals (for clients age 16 and up) and any additional goal deemed appropriate for the particular child
Quarterly reports are written by the OPEN DOOR Social Worker in consultation with the child, foster parents, biological parents, and other professionals
Semi-annual reports are written by the OPEN DOOR Social Worker following a program planning meeting which includes invitations to the child, biological parents, foster parents, government caseworker, and other professionals
Child’s developmental, behavioral, social, educational, emotional, medical, treatment, and academic progress are monitored
Staff works to establish goals with the biological parents to assist in remediating the reasons that made placement necessary.  OPEN DOOR provides casework services and serves as a conduit for additional community-based services
Contact with biological parents (or other family return resources) is a minimum of twice per month assuming the goal is for the child to return to the family


MOTHER/CHILD PLACEMENT

Target:   Teenage girls who enter the child welfare system pregnant and who are making the choice to raise their infant child.  In addition, dependent females in placement who become pregnant and challenge the foster care system to accommodate the additional stress of caring for a young mother and her infant

Objectives of the agency:

A passing grade in the Mother/Infant Parenting Course will indicate the amount of knowledge gained from the course
Through observation and feedback during visits by the Social Workers, the young mother’s progress towards becoming comfortable with and adept at nurturing their child will be monitored
Ensure the mother/baby receives all necessary medical care
Teach community resources and services available while in care



ADOPTION SERVICES

OPEN DOOR is a Statewide Adoption & Permanency Network (SWAN) affiliate and provides the full range of SWAN Adoption services, including post permanency services.  Current services offered are as follows:

Child Profiles

Once used exclusively for children with a goal of adoption, they are now available throughout the duration of the case and for any permanency goal

Child Preparation

Available for any permanency goal
May serve the function of developing a safety plan or helping a child re-acclimate to the home environment if completed for a child returning to the home
Older children referred for this service may have the option to complete a journal rather than a Lifebook

Placement

Services can be used to prepare a child and the pre-adoptive family for the child’s placement in the home
Examples of services: coordinating pre-placement visits, locating a new doctor, assisting with the transfer of records
Can complete Post-Adoption Contact Agreements (PACAs), as per Act 101 of 2011

Finalization

Includes placement supervision and necessary reports for court to complete adoption
The pre-adoptive family is prepped regarding what to expect from court
Typically a service referred once termination of parental rights has occurred and after the appeal period has expired

Child Specific Recruitment (CSR)

Assist with finding pre-adoptive family for a child
Family profiles, interviews and referring worker’s input are used to find the most appropriate match for the child
Help find birth family connections for older children or a child who does not want to be adopted
Staff are currently being trained on Kevin Campbell’s Model of Family Finding

Family Profiles (including Affiliate-Referred Family Profiles)

Available to families who wish to adopt from the Child Welfare System
Families have the ability to contact OPEN DOOR directly

Post-Permanency

Available to families who finalized adoption or who were granted permanent legal custody of a child
Families may refer themselves for services
Assessment takes place and a service plan is developed
Families may then be referred for case management, case advocacy or respite
All services are family-based and voluntary


OUR APPROACH FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS

It has become evident through the years that all social service programs are subject to change, but the one constant remains that it takes the effort of a community as a whole to provide for and meet the needs of our youth.  Our main goal continues to be that of improving the quality of life for the children that enter our programs.  We believe that this can best be accomplished through a combination of advocacy, and efforts to increase biological, sociological and psychological development.  It is our hope that by addressing the aforementioned attributes of our children, we will be able to strengthen family bonds and capitalize on their strengths. 

By connecting the foster and biological families, we develop continuity between both sets of guardians and strengthen the environment in which the child is intended to flourish.  It is also through this process that we attempt to discuss and develop realistic expectations for all involved parties.  Along with developing realistic expectations, it is necessary to continue to improve upon the existing skills of foster and biological families, in addition to addressing their gaps in knowledge of the system and struggles faced by the children.


​​​OPEN DOOR

INTERNATIONAL, INC.

...always room in our hearts for one more.

...making our world a better place...one child at a time.